Ashita no Anime

Anime of Tomorrow

Madoka > Jesus – Madoka Enables; Jesus Indulges

Madoka supports the magic girls

Thanks Safebooru

6. Madoka Enables; Jesus Indulges

Madoka doesn’t invite people to rely on her.  She just fixed a problem that others were incapable of remedying on their own and allowed life to continue.  She gave freedom and because she acts transparently, people don’t depend on her.  Jesus on the other hand is a crutch that people depend on far too much, constantly praying to, asking for more favors and preventing Christians from living their
lives with self-reliance.

What’s despicable is how Christians want to spin every little coincidence of good fortune in our lives to be attributable to Jesus and all of our failures are our own.  “I found my car keys, praise Jesus!” but you never hear, “Jesus made me lose my shoe.”  Even if Christians claim that Jesus helps everyone regardless of belief, in the long run it still doesn’t matter unless you’ve been saved and thank Jesus for looking out for you.

Madoka doesn’t do that.  She’s just the whisper in the wind that’s there to support you, but you stand or fall on your own accord.  Futurama did a good play on this relationship between action and inaction on the part of a deity when Bender became a kind of god to tiny people living on his body as he floated through space.  At first he kept giving them everything they wanted, but they became dependent on him, so he stopped for a while, but when he didn’t perform enough miracles, the masses lost faith and turned away from him.  He realized that gods have to strike a balance between answering prayers and  to keep their followers both free and happy.

However, there’s no problem like this when we analyze how Madoka operates.  Because nobody even suspects that she’s there, she can provide help to those in need without worrying about those she helps becoming dependent on her.  There’s no need for a testament of accomplishments that would only serve to the unnecessary purpose of elevating her position, which reveals the extent of Madoka’s humility.

Why is Madoka the better savior?

While discussing my atheism, I’ve had people tell me they couldn’t get through the day without Jesus.  They spend so much time stopping to pray and praise Jesus for every little thing that I can’t help but wonder how much more productive they would be if they could cut back a little on the worship.

The final tagline from the Madoka series reads, “Always, somewhere, someone is fighting for you.  As long as you remember her, you are never alone.”  Once again, it’s Madoka who is offering assistance while Jesus promotes entitlement by saying things like, “If you believe, you will receive whatever you ask for in prayer.”  Madoka has no need for followers.  Her mission was simply to save people without all the egotistical baggage of also getting them to believe in her and exalt her as the greatest thing since sliced bread.

Madoka > Jesus – Part 1 – Jesus – Human vs God

Madoka > Jesus – Part 2 – The True Sacrifice

Madoka > Jesus – Part 3 – Benevolence Given Freely

Madoka > Jesus – Part 4 – Madoka Succeeded, Jesus Failed

Madoka > Jesus – Part 5 – Madoka is More Plausible

Madoka > Jesus – Part 7 – The Nature of Evil

4 responses to “Madoka > Jesus – Madoka Enables; Jesus Indulges

  1. All Fiction April 28, 2013 at 1:57 am

    Last week, fervent believers of a religion ruined the lives of hundreds of people. And you choose to go off on a rant on Christianity? You don’t hate religion, you just hate Christianity. We need less of you coward Dawkins “atheists” and more thoughtful atheists like Hitchens.

    • Marlin-sama April 28, 2013 at 10:30 am

      You’re going to focus on one high-profile event? What about the ways that all religions hurt people every day? Ani-choicers, anti-vaxers, anti-education, anti-women, history-deniers, genocide, the list is too long. I write about Christianity because it’s what I know best and it’s the major religion of America, making it the biggest target demographic. Even so, I think all religions bring terrible things upon humanity and I can’t possibly address every little issue even if I dedicated my life to writing about these sorts of things. Don’t accuse me of only going after Christianity when it’s pretty much all I’ve got to work with.

      So Hitchens is the thoughtful atheist and Dawkins isn’t? Have you seen any of Hitches’s speeches? He’s much more aggressive than Dawkins sure, but that doesn’t make Dawkins a coward. Hitches is also the author of “God is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything,” and that book was one of my inspirations for writing this series in the first place.

      And I fail to see what makes any atheist a coward. We’re the ones standing up to the majority opinion and saying things that are unpopular. We’re the ones who (if you believe god is real) are risking our afterlives to the pit of fire so that we may speak out on issues that are hindering the progress of humanity. We risk our jobs and the love of our families to be true to ourselves. We are the exact opposite of cowards–we are among the most courageous people in modern society.

      Lastly, your comment did not address my argument, which indicates to me that my position is so unassailable that your only recourse is name-calling. I’m not the coward here, you are. You are the one who can’t attack my ideas, so you attack my character instead. If there’s a next time, leave the weaksauce at home and bring your A-game.

  2. japesland April 29, 2013 at 10:18 pm

    “What’s despicable is how Christians want to spin every little coincidence of good fortune in our lives to be attributable to Jesus and all of our failures are our own. “I found my car keys, praise Jesus!” but you never hear, “Jesus made me lose my shoe.” Even if Christians claim that Jesus helps everyone regardless of belief, in the long run it still doesn’t matter unless you’ve been saved and thank Jesus for looking out for you.”

    The use of the word ‘despicable’ seems rather harsh. From a Christian perspective, ALL that God does is good. The Bible teaches this (pardon my lack of reference here, but I doubt that you would disagree). All evil can be traced back to sin while all good can be traced back to God.

    I apologize for having little more with which to argue, but I assure you that if there was ever a Christian skeptic when it came to attributing coincidence to God, then it is me. Coming from an atheistic perspective is obviously going to spin the story the other way, just as coming from a Christian perspective will spin it the way in which you are describing.

    In regard to the other comment you made, I realize that it was in response to a rather spiteful comment by All Fiction, but I think perhaps you are being a bit too one-sided in the points you raise.

    -“What about the ways that all religions hurt people every day?”
    -What about the ways in which religion helps people every day? Think about the food drives, blood drives, orphanages, etc. that churches have established in history. One of my pet peeves in studying medieval history, for example, is that, despite the despicable actions of the Catholic church, they ignore the many, MANY, good deeds ALSO done by the Catholic church. Also, if you do some research on developmental psychology, you will find that the more religiously involved an adult is (particularly towards middle age), the more mentally healthy they tend to be. The coin has two sides, my friend.

    You could also look at the nature of the “hurt” that has been done “by religion”. I believe that if you look closely at each person who has done something evil in the name of religion, the vast majority (I cannot speak for religions with which I am less familiar, but I do know that this is the case for the majority of popular religions), the fanatics that commit the abominable deeds are acting outside of their faith. One instance would be Christian bombings of abortion clinics. That is entirely unbiblical, so to blame it on the religion would be to ignore the thoughts of the person on the matter (just like it would be simply ignorant to blame the actions of an atheist on the fact that he or she does not believe in God).

    -“Anti-choicers…”
    -What about the 50 million babies that were legally aborted since 1973? Some anti-choicers have done some despicable things, but the pro-life movement does not have the goal of restricting women’s rights, but saving the lives of the unborn. Your other listed “evils” seem sound (perhaps with a little clarification), but this particular point is definitely not objective in the way you put it.

    -“We risk our jobs and the love of our families to be true to ourselves. We are the exact opposite of cowards–we are among the most courageous people in modern society. ”
    -“And I fail to see what makes any atheist a coward. We’re the ones standing up to the majority opinion and saying things that are unpopular.”
    -Again, the coin has two sides. While atheists are being persecuted in one country, Christians are being persecuted in another. Countless Christians have been downright murdered for their faith. I am extremely thankful for the choices that the United States allows me to have in my faith, but the pendulum is swinging away from the Christian majority. This has already been seen online, as the Internet continues to have a tiny minority of represented Christians. I have undergone quite a bit of strife for the combination of my interests and my faith (being a Christian otaku is not easy). I would definitely not call you a coward, but I would definitely not say that any given atheist is courageous, just as I would definitely not say that any given Christian is courageous. Beliefs do not make you courageous, actions do.

    Sorry for that lengthy aside. I actually hate arguing, so I don’t know what go into me here. However, I would recommend you do some reading on the positive points of religion. Religion is not all evil. Anything can make someone do something terrible if they believe in it enough to self-justify their actions (look at politics), religion just tends to be that thing in our world.

    • Marlin-sama May 4, 2013 at 6:43 pm

      “What about the ways in which religion helps people every day?” Here’s the thing. Good from a religious perspective is meaningless because the same good can be provided from a secular perspective without any extra baggage of belief or trying to win converts. Something of an Occam’s Razor of altruism of you will. Also, I’ve actually seen studies that suggest the exact opposite for the relationship between mental health and religiosity.

      There are plenty of passages in the bible where god commands his followers to commit abominable acts. It’s no stretch of the imagination to think that fundamentalists are actually following the real teachings of their religion compared to the mainstream. So by violating god’s orders, you’ve actually decided you’re more moral than god.

      Here’s the thing. You say “babies,” but a blastocyst…an embryo…a fetus is not a baby and equating it with one IS an infraction on a woman’s right to control her own body because at that point it IS a part of her body. The unborn are not alive, they are in a quasi-state of biochemistry and that’s all medical science has to say about it.

      I’d say that writing things like this series qualifies as a courageous act. Simply stating my mind on the public forum of the internet like this reduces my chances of getting hired if a future, potential employer ever reads this.

      I know it’s not easy being a Christian otaku. One of my former coworkers is a Christian fundamentalist and he claims that anime is a creation of the devil. *facepalm*

      I do not believe that religion is evil. But it is a for-profit institution (the currency being believers) and it wants to grow the business. So like I said, the good that it does has baggage, where the goal of nonprofit secular institutions is simply achieving good as its own end.

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